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Directing Resume

For a downloadable / printer-friendly version of Gregg W. Brevoort's Directing Resume:

 

Production Information

THE DRAWER BOY

By MICHAEL HEALEY

Directed by Gregg W. Brevoort

Merc Playhouse
TWISP, WA

Design / Production Team

Set Design

Lighting Design

Costume Design

Stage Manager

Gregg W. Brevoort

Egon Steinebach

Ginny Abdallah

Ginny Abdallah

CAST

Angus

Morgan

Miles

Reed McColm

Brad Harrington

Chad Herrmann

Reviews

METHOW VALLEY NEWS
Drawer Boy Conveys Rituals Of Stories, Life

– “It’s stimulating to watch a new and talented cast and director at work”

– “Well cast ... Tender ... Convincing”

– “Brevoort treats the characters and theme with affection and an easy touch that allows the emotional punch of the story to emerge gradually”

– “Many small touches lend class and sophistication to the production”

Director's Notes

There is something about Canadian plays that are just delightful.  They are moving, often humorous and always quite lyrical.  Of my Top Ten favorite contemporary plays, I’d say that half of them are Canadian, and The Drawer Boy is certainly on that list.

One of the aspects of The Drawer Boy that makes it a personal favorite is its use of storytelling - not only as a central device but as a central theme and metaphor.  I just love how each of the three characters are intimately connected to the act of storytelling:  one who uses it as a profession, one who desperately needs it as a means to function and one who leans on it as a way to cope.  In this beautifully constructed play we see how stories, and the rituals surrounding them, actually have a profound effect on the lives of people.

And of course, it doesn’t escape us that here we are sitting in a theatre assembled for the very act of storytelling itself.  It’s re-affirming to know that what we do as theatre artists and what we seek as audience members can have such an effect.  Theatre has such a restorative power and an ability to transform our lives.  It aids in understanding and may actually heal.  That’s a central belief inherent in the writing of The Drawer Boy and one that we, as theatre artists, certainly share.

PHOTO GALLERY

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