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Directing Resume

For a downloadable / printer-friendly version of Gregg W. Brevoort's Directing Resume:

Production Information

RICHARD III

By William Shakespeare

Directed by Gregg W. Brevoort

Barnstormers Theatre Company
Baltimore, MD

Design / Production Team

Producers

 

Set Design
 

Lighting Design

Costume Design
 

Stage Manager

Asst. Stage Manager

 

Vadim Schick
  & Christina Moreno

Dawn Antoline
  & Gregg W. Brevoort

Liz Austin

Christina Moreno
  & Laura Koitsch

Jennifer Johnson

Jill Rafson
  & Dave Katz

CAST

Richard

Clarence

Brakenbury/
Executioner/
Sir Christopher

Hastings

Lady Anne

Queen Elizabeth

Rivers

Dorset/
Citizen/
Soldier

Buckingham

Stanley

Queen Margaret

Catesby

King Edward IV/
Scrivener

Ratcliffe/
Citizen 3/
Priest/
Guard

Duchess of York

Archbishop

Messenger 1/
Citizen/
Soldier

Mayor/
Messenger 4/
Soldier

Richmond/
Citizen 2

Blount/
Attendant 1/
Murderer 1/
Messenger 1

Tyrrel/
Attendant 2/
Murderer 2/
Messenger 3

Sir Lovell/
Priest/
Soldier

Daughter of Clarence

Prince Duke of York

Prince Edward

Young Elizabeth

Steve Reich

Jonathan Strater



Thomas Kittredge

Jerry Wu

Dilek Barrow

Jesse Chaffee

David Fishman



Marc Winter

Ben Blake

Dave Kotlyar

Christina Moreno

Keylee Pratt


Brandom Neilson




Lisa Dulin

Melissa Rosen

Anna Widmer



Justin Brannock



Adam Gower


Evan Grove




Brian Gish




Chris Celano



Jacob Gilbert

Melanie Ruffner

Kris Jansma

Steve Schenck

Jennifer Johnson

Reviews

the JOHNS hOPKINS NEWS-LETTER
Barnstormers tackle ole Bill's Richard III

– “The sharp acting and beautifully dark atmosphere retained the audience's interest and carried the drama smoothly along its long, bloody path”

– “The play carried itself … very gracefully”

– “Quite stunning atmospheric effect”

– “The extensive cast presented a cohesive front of good acting … all of whom sustained remarkable intensity throughout the three-hour play”

– “Every actor displayed firm, personal command over his or her character, and the dialogues were accordingly tight”

Director's Notes

I am determined to prove a villain ...

With one line Shakespeare articulates two meanings, two worlds, two philosophies – two dramatic opposites.

I am determined to prove a villain ...

The expression of free will – of self-determination – is one that keeps this play firmly rooted in the genre of the History play. Cause and effect; the forward march of events and of history; the linear, political progression of man through history marked by Machiavellian heroes who knew what they wanted and who were determined to achieve their goals …

I am determined to prove a villain ...

The expression of Man’s helplessness in battling the tides of history, however, plants this play in an entirely different theatrical genre, the Tragedy. Like in Oedipus Rex, the oracles speak - and Fate, as it has been pre-determined, remains unstoppable and unalterable.

I am determined to prove a villain ...

Richard III tends to get categorized as either a History or a Tragedy. When, of course, it is both - because Shakespeare has announced right from the top that it would be.

The linear, historical track is apparent enough. With this production the actors here at the Barnstormers and I have been delving into a more classically tragic dimension of this play, which has opened up a deeper and more interesting subterranean world than any of us had expected. Critics have always noticed similarities between this play and the Scottish Play, for example, but during this rehearsal period, we were particularly struck with the darker, supernatural elements that the two tragedies share. It has been our goal to reveal in this play what we see as an age-old dramatic conflict: Free Will vs. Fate; Man against the Gods; the natural vs. the supernatural. History, tragedy. Mortality, Immortality.

We are determined ... 

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