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Directing Resume

For a downloadable / printer-friendly version of Gregg W. Brevoort's Directing Resume:

 

Production Information

TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA

By WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

Directed by Gregg W. Brevoort

TEXAS SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL
KILGORE, TX

Design / Production Team

Set & Prop Design
Lighting Design
Costume Design
Sound Design
Stage Manager
Asst. Stage Manager
Fight Director
Vocal Director
Music Director

Technical Director
Production Manager

Jesse Dreikosen

Anthony Galaska

Steven Graver

Benjamin Stickels

Siobhan Ruane

Katie Chance

Jack Young

Jennifer Burke

Jane Allen

Matt Gist

George Boyd

CAST

Proteus
Valentine
Speed
Julia
Lucetta
Antonio
Panthino
Silvia
Ursula
Lance
Crab
The Duke of Milan
Thurio
Host
Eglamour

 

Citizens of Rome

 

 

 

 

 

Dancing Lovers

 

 

Chanteuse
Piano
Drums
Bass

Max Gordon Moore *

Luke Eddy

Nathan Winklestein

Meaghan Sullivan

Kristyn Chalker

J. Hernandez

Greg Beam

Emily Brooks *

Diedre Cantrell

Anand Nagraj

Ella

Clark Stevens

Andrew Goldwasser

Andi Dema

Jason Richards

 

Zachary Layner

Jacob Grubb
Scott Gibbs
Aidan Eastwood-Paticchio
Greg Beam

 

Rob Sniffin
Kristyn Chalker

 

Angela Shipley

Jane Allen

Dan Spivey

Kevin Kelly

*  members of Actors Equity Association

Reviews

KILGORE NEWS HERALD
TSF’s ‘Two Gents’ pleases full house

– “Brought the audience to its feet”

– “Played exquisitely”

– All the casting is neat”

– “Electrifying for the audience”

 

TYLER MORNING TELEGRAPH
Nagraj Shines In Shakespeare'
s Gentlemanly Comedy

– “The cast is uniformly excellent”

– “The 1930s aesthetic applied to the production is actually a perfect fit for the story and themes”

– “Everyone from the leads to the supporters providing uniformly solid work”

– “This production is more than worth seeing”

 

 

PROGRAM NOTES

The Two Gentlemen of Verona is considered by many to be Shakespeare’s first comedy - and even by others to be considered his very first play. In it we see the seeds of many of the themes and devices yet to come. Julia is the first of the Shakespearean heroines to don a boy’s habit, a contrivance shared with this season’s As You Like It (as are the banished outlaws, retired into the forest: They may very well be Duke Senior and his exiled court). Valentine’s soliloquy, anguishing over his banishment, is strikingly similar to Romeo’s in Romeo and Juliet. To be banished is to die, cry both characters. There is a strong reliance on letters and on the exchange of rings. In Act I, scene 2, Julia and Lucetta assess the quality of suitors, as do Portia and Nerissa in The Merchant of Venice. The list goes on and on. However, it is the first and only Shakespeare play that features a dog. Some things even Shakespeare couldn’t improve upon.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona also sports the smallest cast of any of Shakespeare’s plays and has an unusual number of two and three character scenes, which makes the play a delight for modern actors and directors to work on – perhaps an indication of Shakespeare wanting to start out simply before increasing the sophistication of his stagecraft.

The themes of Two Gents are ones that we will see time and time again throughout the canon: Friendship, Love, and the conflict that can arise when the two get in the way of each other. Another timeless and consistent motif: the foolish behavior that Love can elicit.

In our production, in keeping with an emerging TSF tradition, we have found that the music of the 1930’s perfectly captures the passion and the foolishness of Love and seems to comment splendidly and elegantly on the play and its proceedings. “Fools Rush In,” one of many song selections you will hear this evening, seems especially appropriate – and not just because Two Gents contains two of Shakespeare’s greatest fools, Speed and Lance, but because ALL of the characters in the play (and frankly, anybody who has ever been in love), could equally be regarded as such.

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